A glimpse of glitter...

Mizu, 25, Hong Kong; Ravenclaw (or so I think); Majored in Linguistics; Multilingual.
Current Fandoms:
Cabin Pressure is Brilliant! Sherlock, Doctor Who, the Newsroom, Game of Thrones, Elementary, Person of Interest, Black Mirror, to name a few......and I'm Cumberbatched ever since Sherlock :D

(p.s. sorry if my English isn't perfect, I'm not a native speaker of English ^^)
Posts I Like

pricklylegs:

These are gold.

(via reducto1)

pricklylegs:

These are gold.

(via reducto1)

thefemcritique:

envy4breakfast:

CollegeHumor: The 10 Lies You Tell Yourself Every All-Nighter

Lies I am currently telling myself. These are so accurate

(via johanirae)

wuglife:

As Peterson says in his talk, a big part of the process of naturalizing conlangs is attempting to imitate the quirks and idiosyncrasies of a natural language as it evolves over time. In developing Dothraki, Peterson started by imagining how the Dothraki people would have spoken 1,000 years in the past. Creating a protolanguage allowed Peterson to evolve Dothraki “organically,” changing its sounds, grammar and semantics. But how do you create linguistic regression?

The first challenge in imagining a lost culture is to unlearn what you know about modern technology in order to grasp a linguistic view of the world before, say, books and medicine. Says Peterson, “You become part historian, part archaeologist, part detective. You say, ‘Here were my resources, how did I know all this stuff?’”

Happy (slightly belated) Game of Thrones season premiere, everyone!

This article goes into the process and intentions behind the creation of Dothraki and the way Peterson (dedalvs) attempts to mimic organic development of the language. What’s really incredible about this process is how our understanding of linguistics, sociolinguistics, and anthropology all inform the development of a conlang. Although Peterson doesn’t need to create the world behind the Dothraki language (since GRRM’s canon world is already fleshed out), he still must consider small details and historical mindsets that aren’t discussed in the books or show. Just like languages exist as nebulous and ever-changing entities within and between humans, an organic-like constructed language must mimic the variation and irregularity of naturally occurring human languages. The more we learn about how our human language faculties work, like what their limitations are and why they work the way they do, the more “accurate” our creative endeavors to mimic human language can be.

(Maybe it should be — at least, it should be as hard as speaking any other language!)

Nathan Fillion talks about  Christina Ochoa on Conan O’Brien | April 15, 2014

My girlfriend was looking at all these incredible toenail thing art online and I said, “I can do that.” And she said, “Oh, yeah? Put your money where your mouth is.” So I had to, I did- actually, that’s not what she said. She actually didn’t say that. (x)

(via utherwasntallthatbad)

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

argea:

this is like my third favorite thing ever

(via methodsinthemadness)

princeonice:

kuchibiru-devil:

princeonice:

So 14-year-old Tomoharu Ushida is apparently a fan of Yuzuru and his new album has piano covers of Parisienne Walkways and Nino Rota’s Romeo and Juliet and asjkfgh yeah ♥

Wow both are so beautiful! T.T I wish I had the music score now….

Parisienne Walkways sheet music (on guitar, but you can use the notes and ignore the tabs)

Arrangement of Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet (by Henry Mancini, on piano)

These aren’t the exact pieces played by Tomoharu, and Yuzuru uses different instrumental/orchestral versions obviously, but hopefully someone can get something out of this c:

(via fuckyeah-yuzuruhanyu)

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

Blouse Collars, 1940s-50s - By Charlotte Dymock.

there was a lot of bullshit in the forties and fifties but the style was not part of it

(via allam)

(via deerspeak)